ATP E008: How to Train a Dog

ATP E008

This week I’m taking the opportunity to re-post show notes from Across The Peak Episode 8, which aired last week. If you haven’t checked us out yet, I want to give you an idea of what you’re missing, as well as show off  a few pictures of my dog. Enjoy!


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This week Rich and Justin talk about the making of a well trained dog!

Note from Justin: This was a fun episode to record! We recommend a ton of books during this show, but I will want to hit especially hard on four of them. If you read and internalize these four books you will be far better equipped to embark upon the journey of training your dog.

Intro stuff

The Importance of a Well-Trained Dog

  • Less stress for dog and owner
  • A happier dog and owner
  • More freedom for the dog
  • The dog’s safety
  • The safety of others (people and dogs) the dog comes into contact with
  • Courtesy to other people

Choosing a Dog Breed

  • Smarter dogs are easier to train, learn faster, and respond more quickly to commands
  • The Intelligence of Dogs by Stanley Coren
  • Selecting a dog with high play drive
Rich’s dogs: Irish Wolfhounds.
Justin’s Dog: German Shepherd Dog

Building a Relationship With Your Dog

Book Recommendation: Inside of a Dog by Alexandra Horowitz

Training Your Dog

  • Build a Training Plan
    • Decide what you want the dog to do
    • Decide what you don’t want the dog to do
  • Standardize commands
  • Punishment and negative reinforcement
  • Rewards: food rewards vs. play rewards
  • Rewarding with play
  • Rewarding with positive reinforcement
  • Crate training
  • CONSISTENCY, CONSISTENCY, CONSISTENCY
    • Consistency in commands you give your dog
    • Situationally consistent
    • Consistency in enforcement
    • Consistent across all handlers (you, spouse, children, dog-sitter, etc.)

13 thoughts on “ATP E008: How to Train a Dog”

    1. Thanks, Riley! I think we start to hit our stride in this one, and the next few episodes just keep getting better – thanks for listening!

  1. I don’t know a RevolverGuy who isn’t a dog lover . . . the two just seem to be a natural pairing. Those are all beautiful dogs–love the pictures, and I’m looking forward to listening to the podcast and learning.

    1. I’m warming up to dogs, especially calm ones like my wife’s Bernese, but I still consider myself a cat person. Sorry, Mike. I just had to burst your bubble a bit.

      1. Greyson…say it ain’t so!

        I used to say, “I’m a dog person” but that has changed. I stole a line from a really great friend, who is the owner of another extremely well-trained GSD. Now I say, “I’m a well-behaved dog person!”

      2. Sheesh! Next thing we know, you’ll be telling us about your shiny new M&P self-chucker.

        Oh, wait . . .

        ; ^ )

        It’s OK bud, we’ve got one of each around here. The cat is definitely the smarter one, but I love ’em both. We’ll turn you into a well-behaved dog person yet!

        1. I’m confused; the M&P is a fixed-sight .38 Special revolver, not a self-chucker. If I was going to get a bottom feeder, it would probably be a CZ 75 D compact. That said, I’m actually more likely to cut my semi-auto collection in half by selling my LCP to finance another revolver (I need a .22 LR kit-type gun).

  2. I’m carefully gonna side with Greyson here, somewhat more cat oriented. I do like both though, kinda like “country AND western”!

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