Guns that Got Away: Steve

When I think of the guns that got away, I remember attending gun shows with my dad.  My father went through periods of gun collecting that focused on certain types of guns.  At one point he was into German made Walther PPK pistols.  A particular seller had a dozen PPK 7.65mm pistols on his table.  They were all nice.  One was priced much lower than the rest. It had an odd cloisonné medallion on its left grip panel.  When my dad inquired about it, the seller said, “Yeah, someone must have glued that on there.  I don’t know what it’s supposed to mean, but it ruins the value of the gun.  That’s why I have it priced so cheap. I think if I tried to get it off there, I’d ruin the grip.” 

Continue reading “Guns that Got Away: Steve”

A Special Fitz: My Fitz Colt Official Police

My dad subscribed to many of the gun magazines back in the mid-1970s and I’d leaf through them, pausing to read a story when something special caught my eye: a Fitz Colt. One article in particular featured a photo of a stubby revolver with a short barrel, a short grip, a bobbed hammer, and a cut away trigger guard. That last feature was the most intriguing to me. Continue reading “A Special Fitz: My Fitz Colt Official Police”

New for 2018: SHOT Show Revolvers

The 40th annual Shooting, Hunting, Outdoor Trade (SHOT) Show was held at the Sands Expo Center inside the Venetian resort in Las Vegas this past January 2018. The massive event was attended by over 60,000 industry professionals and two of your RevolverGuy cohorts. Mike Wood certainly looked professional, especially at the Kimber shooting range stall as he took notes from Kimber’s engineers. This was my seventh SHOT Show, so at least I was able to keep the huge grin off my face…most of the time. Let’s make it at least 60,002 professionals. Continue reading “New for 2018: SHOT Show Revolvers”

A RevolverGuy Tribute to Skeeter Skelton

Skeeter Skelton once wrote that the only way to improve upon the Smith & Wesson Model 24 .44 Special would be to make it in stainless steel.  Soon after, S&W presented the Model 624, a .44 Special N-frame made from stainless instead of carbon steel.  I happened to have read Skeeter’s words a few days prior to walking into a local gun store that had a 624 in their used gun display.   It had the 4-inch barrel (6-inches was an option) and was wearing Pachmayr rubber grips.  The price was right with no box or papers and I became the new owner of my first .44 Special. Continue reading “A RevolverGuy Tribute to Skeeter Skelton”

Ruger Review: The .44 Special GP100

The .44 Special cartridge is an enigma.  Many knowledgeable handgunners can’t understand its attraction.  But, for the same reason that revolvers are still made in .38 Special, even though that round will fire in a .357 Magnum, the .44 Special round carries on, even though it can be fired from a .44 Magnum as well.  Some shooters opt for a .44 Magnum knowing full well that they’re more likely to fire .44 Specials most of the time.  Having a gun that fires multiple chamberings is a sound idea and a concrete way of looking at things, especially if cost keeps one from purchasing multiple firearms.  Continue reading “Ruger Review: The .44 Special GP100”