Am I Crazy? The Revolver Equation

Am I crazy? As you know I’ve been carrying a J-Frame revolver for almost two years now. I really enjoy this little round gun. I can almost literally forget it’s there, but it’s actually fun to shoot. I’m intimately familiar with it and I can run it pretty hard. However, lately I’ve begun to feel that I’m operating at the top of the gun’s capability (with my 686 on the other hand, I doubt I will ever feel limited by the revolver). I have also begun to feel like maybe it’s time to move back to something a little more capable. With this in mind I’ve been looking at other revolvers.

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Flying with Firearms: Delta Airlines CAGPT

Several months ago I wrote an article about flying with firearms for Lucky Gunner. I travel often and usually bring along a revolver, so I consider myself reasonably informed about air travel with firearms. I guess I’m late to the party, because I just learned of the Delta Airlines CAGPT program. If you haven’t flown with firearms in a while, you might think twice before booking a ticket with Delta. I know I’m not the first person to write about this issue, but I do have a few observations from a recent travel experience. Continue reading “Flying with Firearms: Delta Airlines CAGPT”

Shooting Cars with a .357 Magnum

It’s not too often that I get to shoot up a car, but it has happened a few times in my career. What is really rare is getting to shoot up a nice, clean car, and being the only one shooting it. I had this opportunity about a year ago as part of a military exercise I was working on. I can’t get into too much detail, but there was a requirement for a shot-up car and I was lucky enough to be asked to fulfill the requirement. This isn’t one of those articles about shooting cars filled with gelatin blocks and there aren’t any  real insights to be gained here – just some fun pictures! Continue reading “Shooting Cars with a .357 Magnum”

Filing Your Revolver’s Front Sight

The small defensive revolver is a compromise. In carrying one I have compromised some benefits of a larger gun, like capacity, ease of use. I have also sacrificed some practical accuracy that a larger revolver or pistol would afford. When my 640 Pro refused to shoot to point-of-aim with any load I tried, I decided this was not a compromise I could live with – I don’t want to have to rely on Kentucky windage when fractions of a second really count. So, I resorted to what those of us with non-adjustable sights sometimes have to. If you find yourself in this situation,  you may find yourself filing your revolver’s front sight.

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Blast from the Past: Popular Police Speedloaders of the 1970s

In the early moments of 6 April 1970, a desperate gun battle erupted between officers of the California Highway Patrol and two heavily armed felons in the unincorporated city of Newhall, California. The felons killed four officers, making the “Newhall Shooting” one of the most deadly law enforcement gunfights of the modern era, and the most deadly in the history of the California Highway Patrol (CHP).

The last officer slain by the felons was killed while attempting to reload his revolver and get back into the fight. Officer James E. Pence, Jr. had just completed filling the cylinder of his Colt Python with loose cartridges from his dump pouch, and was in the process of closing the cylinder, when he was killed with an execution-style shot to the back of his head. Continue reading “Blast from the Past: Popular Police Speedloaders of the 1970s”

Identifying & Clearing The Revolver Squib Load

Last weekend I had spent half my Saturday at a private range with a friend and his son. It was just the three of us on the range. In addition to some true plinking, we shot the 5×5 drill, did some plate-rack work, and ran an informal competition or two. Toward the end of the day I let the other two guys take a few shots my my 686. When the 14-year old dropped the hammer on his first round, the result was an unimpressive fizzle. It was the first revolver squib load I’ve ever witnessed and my range session came to an abrupt end. But, I definitely learned a couple of things. Continue reading “Identifying & Clearing The Revolver Squib Load”

Welcome to RevolverGuy.com

Welcome to RevolverGuy.com!

I got the inspiration for this blog when I decided to trim down my firearms battery and get back to basics. This was partially for financial reasons, partially for practicality’s sake, and partly because…well, I’ve always had a soft spot for wheel guns. So, I got rid of my slab-sided 1911s, soulless Glocks, and other self-cockers, but held on to the rotators. I started getting them out on the range, carrying them, and taking them to IDPA matches. And I noticed two things:

The first thing I noticed: people were interested in them! When I could pull off a decently fast reload, people suddenly wanted to shoot their revolvers, too. The second thing I noticed: there aren’t a whole lot of good revolvers-only blogs on the internet. Seeing a niche in the market, I decided to make my own.

Welcome to RevolverGuy.com

What I’m not: I’m not in my 60’s or 70’s. Actually, I’m not even in my 40’s yet. I’m not an expert or world champion shooter. I’m not a guy that owns three dozen revolvers, and this isn’t a industry micro-blog. I’m just a dude with a limited budget like everyone else, so this won’t – unfortunately – be the gun-of-the-month club.

From right to left: Ruger LCR, Kimber K6S, S&W 640 Pro, Ruger SP101, S&W 327, S&W 66, S&W 686, S&W 28. And no, they're not all mine.
From right to left: Ruger LCR, Kimber K6S, S&W 640 Pro, Ruger SP101, S&W 386, S&W 66, S&W 686, S&W 28. And no, they’re not all mine.

Who am I? At the end of the day, I’m just a guy that loves revolvers. But I’m a decent revolver shooter and the word “enthusiast” probably fits me pretty well. And ultimately, that’s what revolverguy.com is – a place to share my enthusiasm for revolvers and maybe a few other topics that I really enjoy. So sit back, stay tuned, and enjoy!