The Kramer Belt Scabbard & The Colt King Cobra

When conducting my field test of the Colt King Cobra, I neglected to carry this revolver for want of a holster. This is a pretty common problem with firearms that are new to the market. Leather workers and Kydex benders need a little time to catch up to new designs. Though Kramer Gunleather didn’t list a model for the King Cobra, I reach ed out to them anyhow. I lucked out, and they offered to send us a Kramer Belt Scabbard. Continue reading “The Kramer Belt Scabbard & The Colt King Cobra”

Galco Combat Master Scabbard

I have been carrying appendix for about three years now and you can put me down firmly in the “appendix guy” category. It’s OK if you’re not – I’m just letting you know where I stand. As much as I like it, though, carrying appendix isn’t always possible. Appendix can get quite uncomfortable if you have to hold a certain position for long periods of time, and some types of dress and activity don’t support the method. Continue reading “Galco Combat Master Scabbard”

Kenai Chest Holster from Gunfighters, Inc.

Smith & Wesson recently sent us a model 610† for review. As soon as that T&E was in the works I realized I didn’t have a suitable holster for the big N-Frame. I wanted to carry the gun, at least a little, in a platform that suited its ideal purpose: hunting or defense in the great outdoors. Someone pointed me in the direction of the Kenai Chest Holster, and I’m glad they did. Continue reading “Kenai Chest Holster from Gunfighters, Inc.”

Universal Holster: The Galco Switchback

I suppose I’m not like most gun owners. One way in which I likely differ is I like a full complement of support equipment for each gun I own. At a minimum this means one high-quality holster and a couple speedloaders for each of my revolvers. When the Galco Switchback was announced I found myself wondering what utility a universal fit holster would offer me. Continue reading “Universal Holster: The Galco Switchback”

Unconventional Carry: Coat Hanger Carry

A couple weekends ago I picked up the most recent issue of Skillset Magazine (Summer 2019 Edition). Much to my surprise, one of the articles was on the use of snubby revolvers by, shall we say, interesting personnel. The featured photograph caught my eye because there was a twisted piece of coat hanger wrapped around the an old S&W .38. I didn’t understand what I was looking at until I read the article and saw the term “coat hanger carry.” Continue reading “Unconventional Carry: Coat Hanger Carry”

The DeSantis FLETC 2.0

As dedicated revolver enthusiasts, your RevolverGuy team occupies a unique position in the industry. There are very few individuals and groups out there with such a concentrated focus on revolvers, and that’s afforded us some unique opportunities to work with manufacturers on product improvements and new ideas. One recent project that we were proud to play a small role in was the development of the new FLETC 2.0 holster from DeSantis. Continue reading “The DeSantis FLETC 2.0”

Harry’s Holsters’ Icon Revolver Holster

Though (as you guys know) I’m carrying a slab-sided bottom feeder on a daily basis, I haven’t completely ditched my J-Frame. The  640 Pro gets pulled for those times when I must be 100% positive that my gun concealed. The holster it has been riding in is one I’ve yet to mention here: the Harry’s Holsters Icon J-Frame holster. Continue reading “Harry’s Holsters’ Icon Revolver Holster”

Fighting Leather: The Breakfront, Part II

In Part I of this series, we discussed the birth of the breakfront holster with the Berns-Martin design, as well as the development of competing designs from popular police holster makers Hoyt and Safety Speed.

We now pick up the breakfront saga where we left off  . . .

Continue reading “Fighting Leather: The Breakfront, Part II”

Fighting Leather: The Breakfront, Part I

While some of the nation’s oldest uniformed police departments trace their roots back to the mid-1800s, it wasn’t until the early 20th Century that the majority of American police sidearms moved from tunic pockets to openly-carried duty holsters. The earliest rigs were generally substandard in materials and design, and it wasn’t long before the search for the perfect police duty holster occupied the minds of uniformed lawmen from coast to coast.

Continue reading “Fighting Leather: The Breakfront, Part I”