Dry Practice Report #1: Jan 1 to Jan 11

My first post of this year briefly discussed my goal of doing 3,650 minutes of dry practice in 2019. I’ve just wrapped up my first (almost) two weeks of dry practice. I know these posts probably won’t interest most of you; they are mostly for my own accountability. Here are my results to this point in the year: Continue reading “Dry Practice Report #1: Jan 1 to Jan 11”

Revolver Dot Torture Practice Session

I did a ton of shooting in 2018. I admit that much of it wasn’t as structured as I like. Recently I’ve made it a priority to add some structure to my practice sessions. One drill that is accessible to just about anyone is the famed “Dot Torture” drill. I’m sure most of you are familiar with it but I’m going to talk about it anyway. Continue reading “Revolver Dot Torture Practice Session”

3,650 Minutes of Dry Practice

It seems fashionable to look down one’s nose at new year’s resolutions and to say “now I’m not one for making resolutions…” But I’m making one, and here goes: I’ve read with envy as Claude Werner writes about his 1,000 Days of Dry Practice. I’d love to commit to any number of consecutive days of dry practice but my travel schedule just doesn’t permit it. I know, for instance, I have 12 days of overseas travel next month and my “record” will get broken then. Continue reading “3,650 Minutes of Dry Practice”

Some Thoughts on Being a Professional Instructor

I have spent the better part of the last nine years as a professional, full-time instructor. I’m not a “presenter” or “speaker” – I am an instructor. I take great pride in my craft. People walk away from my classes with quantifiable skills. I’m not an expert on many of my interest areas, but professional instruction is a topic on which I consider myself extremely well versed. Today I’m going to share some generalities and observations I’ve picked up over the years. Continue reading “Some Thoughts on Being a Professional Instructor”

Why YOU Should Be Proficient with Double Action Revolvers

I frequently get the question, “why revolvers?” Using revolvers doesn’t make much sense to some, especially in today’s world of inexpensive, reliable, high-capacity semi-autos. However, I still contend that gun owners should be well rounded. This means that you – yeah, YOU! Over there with the HK V-whatever – should know how to operate a revolver proficiently. This post will probably mostly be preaching to the choir, but that’s OK – it might help you to answer the, “why revolvers?” question. My real hope is that you will direct the asker of that question here, so I can explain! Continue reading “Why YOU Should Be Proficient with Double Action Revolvers”

Training Opportunity: Rogers Memorial Revolver Roundup

The Pat Rogers Memorial Revolver Roundup is just around the corner! Unfortunately I won’t be able to attend this year’s Roundup, but I do want to make sure that everyone here knows about it. The course will feature some absolute top-notch instruction, the opportunity to see some really sweet revolvers, and the chance to rub shoulders with a bunch of other RevolverGuys. If there’s one revolver event to go to, this is probably it! I don’t want to re-invent the wheel (pun totally intended), and I couldn’t describe it any better, so here is the description of the course from the Eventbrite page: Continue reading “Training Opportunity: Rogers Memorial Revolver Roundup”

AAR: Chuck Haggard Practical Revolvers Class

Early this year I wrote that my goal was to attend at least two professional training sessions by year’s end. After attending Competition Handgun back in May, I am happy to report that I recently completed my two-course goal with Chuck Haggard’s Practical Revolvers. Though this class was only a day long (and was cut short by rain) I was thoroughly impressed.  I also have a request for you guys, so please read all the way to the end.

Continue reading “AAR: Chuck Haggard Practical Revolvers Class”

How To Safely Unload a Double Action Revolver

One of the most celebrated qualities of the double action revolver is its simplicity. The mechanism is easy to understand and operate, and having everything “out there in the open” makes their operation pretty transparent, even for the greenest of newbies. Any instructor who has seen an unfamiliar student get confused by the collection of buttons and levers and switches on the side of a semiauto pistol can appreciate how the revolver’s minimalist nature simplifies teaching the manual of arms.

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AAR: Mike Seeklander’s Competition Handgun I

I recently had the opportunity to attend Mike Seeklander’s Competition Handgun I. This two-day course is designed to train the techniques taught in Mike’s book, Your Competition Handgun Training Program. The coolest part of this course was that the two-day training concluded with an optional third-day at a large IDPA match. Even if you have no interest in competition there is a lot to be gained from this course. Continue reading “AAR: Mike Seeklander’s Competition Handgun I”

A Critical Look at the New York Reload

I have been accused by some of you of ignoring the New York Reload. Honestly, this criticism is totally fair. I haven’t written about it and I don’t think about it very much. However, this is a technique that should be addressed. If you know me, you know I’ll address the good, the bad, and the ugly of everything, including the New York Reload, so let’s get started. Continue reading “A Critical Look at the New York Reload”